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The Weekend Quiz – September 21-22, 2019

Summary:
Welcome to The Weekend Quiz. The quiz tests whether you have been paying attention or not to the blog posts that I post. See how you go with the following questions. Your results are only known to you and no records are retained. 1. Some mainstream economists claim that a public debt ratio of 80 per cent is a dangerous threshold that should not be passed. Accordingly, governments should run primary surpluses (taxation revenue in excess of non-interest government spending) to keep the ratio below the threshold. Modern monetary theory tells us that while a currency-issuing government running a deficit can never reduce the debt ratio it doesn't matter anyway because such a government faces no risk of insolvency.TrueFalse2. Imagine that macroeconomic policy is geared towards

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Welcome to The Weekend Quiz. The quiz tests whether you have been paying attention or not to the blog posts that I post. See how you go with the following questions. Your results are only known to you and no records are retained.

1. Some mainstream economists claim that a public debt ratio of 80 per cent is a dangerous threshold that should not be passed. Accordingly, governments should run primary surpluses (taxation revenue in excess of non-interest government spending) to keep the ratio below the threshold. Modern monetary theory tells us that while a currency-issuing government running a deficit can never reduce the debt ratio it doesn't matter anyway because such a government faces no risk of insolvency.



2. Imagine that macroeconomic policy is geared towards keeping real GDP growth on trend. Assume this rate of growth is 3 per cent per annum. If labour productivity is growing at 2 per cent per annum and the labour force is growing at 1.5 per cent per annum and the average working week is constant in hours, then this policy regime will result in




3. Students are taught that the macroeconomic income determination system can be thought of as a bath tub with the current GDP being the water level. The drain plug can be thought of as saving, imports and taxation payments (the so-called leakages from the expenditure system) while the taps can be thought of as investment, government spending and exports (the so-called exogenous injections into the spending system). This analogy is valid because GDP will be unchanged as long as the flows into the bath are equal to the flows out of it which is tantamount to saying the the spending gap left by the leakages is always filled by the injections.





Bill Mitchell
Bill Mitchell is a Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE), at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia. He is also a professional musician and plays guitar with the Melbourne Reggae-Dub band – Pressure Drop. The band was popular around the live music scene in Melbourne in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The band reformed in late 2010.

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