Thursday , April 22 2021
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My blog is on holiday today

Summary:
My blog is on holiday today in the nation’s capital. It was safe to be here because all the politicians and their advisors have gone back home! Last night I saw the fabulous Demons outsmart the Giants (who seem to think punching behind play is the way forward). It was great to see the old MCG manual scoreboard (which was transplanted to Manuka Oval in Canberra when the MGC was rebuilt (some say modernised). Anyway, tomorrow we will be back, but for the rest of the day, you might listen to some music provided below. The old MCG Scoreboard I spent many hours at the Melbourne Cricket Ground as a youngster, wagging school, jumping fences, evading security guards to get into games etc. All part of growing up in Melbourne I guess. The scoreboard was an essential part of sport in Melbourne.

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My blog is on holiday today in the nation’s capital. It was safe to be here because all the politicians and their advisors have gone back home! Last night I saw the fabulous Demons outsmart the Giants (who seem to think punching behind play is the way forward). It was great to see the old MCG manual scoreboard (which was transplanted to Manuka Oval in Canberra when the MGC was rebuilt (some say modernised). Anyway, tomorrow we will be back, but for the rest of the day, you might listen to some music provided below.

My blog is on holiday today

The old MCG Scoreboard

I spent many hours at the Melbourne Cricket Ground as a youngster, wagging school, jumping fences, evading security guards to get into games etc.

All part of growing up in Melbourne I guess.

The scoreboard was an essential part of sport in Melbourne.

This story is worth reading – MCG Scoreboard – if, like me, you like the old scoreboards rather than the new digital ones, which bombard spectators with ads for gambling and other mass consumption items rather than sticking to the facts.

The scoreboard I grew up with at the MCG, which is now at Manuka Oval, was built in 1907.

Here it is in all its glory in the old City Stand (now gone) during the – 1981 VFL Grand Final.

There were 112,964 spectators turned up that day.

It was the last time the scoreboard was used at the MCG.

Don’t mention who won!

My blog is on holiday today

Here is a story about the relocation of the scoreboard to – Manuka Oval in Canberra.

This is what the board looks like now in its new location – it was relocated and rebuilt in November 1982.

My blog is on holiday today

Music – Idle Moments

This is what I have been listening to while working early this morning before I catch a flight home.

It fits with the theme of the day.

The – Idle Moments – album was released on the Blue Note label in 1965, two years after it was recorded.

My blog is on holiday today

The guitarist is – Grant Green – who us one of my favourite guitar players.

He isn’t a player who would appear on many lists of the most famous jazz guitarists but he is close to the top of my list.

He recorded a massive number of tracks as a session player for Blue Note during the 1960s.

He was in the hardbop tradition while at Blue Note, but later branched out in the early 1970s and started paving the way for what we now call Acid Jazz.

On this album (and the title track) are the best players of the day:

1. Joe Henderson – tenor saxophone

2. Duke Pearson – piano

3. Bob Cranshaw – double bass

4. Al Harewood – drums

5. Bobby Hutcherson – vibraphone

This is the title track in C-minor and was written by the pianist Duke Pearson.

If you follow up you will learn that the track was meant to be only 7 minutes long (to fit with vinyl LP conventional time limits of the day) but Green continued to solo for 64 rather than 32 bars and the other soloists followed his lead which meant the track was twice long as planned.

They tried another shorter take but decided the longer version was far superior. They then rerecorded the other two tracks on the album (making them shorter).

He also did weird things to his amp to get that sound – basically only turning the bass and treble down to zero and the midrange settings to 10! I tried that once to see the effect but it only seems to work on Gibson 330s with the P-90 pickups.

His later work was looked down upon by the traditional jazz players, in the same way that Miles Davis’ transition to fusion in the late 1960s was dismissed by the so-called ‘purists’ (aka narrow-minded bigots).

I especially like – Iron City (released in 1972 on the Cobblestone label) – if you are interested.

Grant Green died at the very young age of 43 in 1979.

Anyway, in fitting with my holiday today here is ‘Idle Moments’.

That is enough for today!

(c) Copyright 2021 William Mitchell. All Rights Reserved.

Bill Mitchell
Bill Mitchell is a Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE), at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia. He is also a professional musician and plays guitar with the Melbourne Reggae-Dub band – Pressure Drop. The band was popular around the live music scene in Melbourne in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The band reformed in late 2010.

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