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“America First,” Fiscal Policy, And Financial Stability

Summary:
“America First,” Fiscal Policy, And Financial StabilityThe Levy Institute Of Bard College was far ahead of anyone with its prescience on the fate of the U.S. economy (and also the world) before the crisis. So everyone should read them. Michalis Nikiforos and Gennaro Zezza have a new Strategic Analysis report.Abstract:The US economy has been expanding continuously for almost nine years, making the current recovery the second longest in postwar history. However, the current recovery is also the slowest recovery of the postwar period.This Strategic Analysis presents the medium-run prospects, challenges, and contradictions for the US economy using the Levy Institute’s stock-flow consistent macroeconometric model. By comparing a baseline projection for 2018–21 in which no budget or tax changes

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“America First,” Fiscal Policy, And Financial Stability

The Levy Institute Of Bard College was far ahead of anyone with its prescience on the fate of the U.S. economy (and also the world) before the crisis. So everyone should read them. Michalis Nikiforos and Gennaro Zezza have a new Strategic Analysis report.

Abstract:

The US economy has been expanding continuously for almost nine years, making the current recovery the second longest in postwar history. However, the current recovery is also the slowest recovery of the postwar period.

This Strategic Analysis presents the medium-run prospects, challenges, and contradictions for the US economy using the Levy Institute’s stock-flow consistent macroeconometric model. By comparing a baseline projection for 2018–21 in which no budget or tax changes take place to three additional scenarios, the authors isolate the likely macroeconomic impacts of: (1) the recently passed tax bill; (2) a large-scale public infrastructure plan of the same “fiscal size” as the tax cuts; and (3) the spending increases entailed by the Bipartisan Budget Act and omnibus bill. Finally, Nikiforos and Zezza update their estimates of the likely outcome of a scenario in which there is a sharp drop in the stock market that induces another round of private-sector deleveraging.

Although in the near term the US economy could see an acceleration of its GDP growth rate due to the recently approved increase in federal spending and the new tax law, it is increasingly likely that the recovery will be derailed by a crisis that will originate in the financial sector.

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