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Anthony Thirlwall — Thoughts On Balance-Of-Payments-Constrained Growth After 40 Years

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Anthony Thirlwall — Thoughts On Balance-Of-Payments-Constrained Growth After 40 YearsROKE (Review Of Keynesian Economics) has a special issue, Thirlwall’s Law At 40, celebrating Thirlwall’s law which Anthony Thilwall discovered in 1979.Thirlwall himself has an article in the issue.Interesting, from the conclusion:Structural change almost certainly requires a country to design an industrial policy embracing a national innovation system to facilitate the flow of technological knowledge across all sectors of the economy. The market mechanism itself is unlikely to bring about the required structural changes needed. I am attracted to the concepts of growth diagnostics (Hausmann et al. 2008) and self-discovery (Hausmann and Rodrik 2003). Growth diagnostics involves locating the binding

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Anthony Thirlwall — Thoughts On Balance-Of-Payments-Constrained Growth After 40 Years

ROKE (Review Of Keynesian Economics) has a special issue, Thirlwall’s Law At 40, celebrating Thirlwall’s law which Anthony Thilwall discovered in 1979.

Thirlwall himself has an article in the issue.

Interesting, from the conclusion:

Structural change almost certainly requires a country to design an industrial policy embracing a national innovation system to facilitate the flow of technological knowledge across all sectors of the economy. The market mechanism itself is unlikely to bring about the required structural changes needed. I am attracted to the concepts of growth diagnostics (Hausmann et al. 2008) and self-discovery (Hausmann and Rodrik 2003). Growth diagnostics involves locating the binding constraints on a country’s economic performance and to target these directly, giving the most favourable outcome from the resources available compared to the ‘spray gun’ approach to economic policy-making which may not hit hard enough the binding constraints on growth that really matter. In the case of the BoP, it would involve targeting exports with growth potential, and identifying imports where there is import substitution potential. Government expenditure on R&D to enhance export quality could reap high returns. Self-discovery involves seeking out new areas of comparative advantage and then implementing the most appropriate policies to foster them. Hausmann and Rodrik point out that there is much randomness in the process of a country discovering what it is best at producing, and a lack of protection reduces the incentive to invest in discovering what goods and services they are. Governments need to encourage entrepreneurship and invest in new activities, but the first best policy is not by the traditional means of tariffs and quotas, but public sector credit and guarantees which reward the innovator (and not the copy-cats), and can be withdrawn if firms do not perform well after a certain period of time.

Anthony Thirlwall — Thoughts On Balance-Of-Payments-Constrained Growth After 40 Years

Anthony Thirlwall, picture via Wikipedia

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