Wednesday , April 24 2019
Home / V. Ramanan: Concerted Action / Distributional Financial Accounts Of The United States

Distributional Financial Accounts Of The United States

Summary:
Distributional Financial Accounts Of The United StatesThe Distributional Financial Accounts (DFAs) provide a quarterly measure of the distribution of U.S. household wealth since 1989, based on a comprehensive integration of disaggregated household-level wealth data with official aggregate wealth measures. The data set contains the level and share of each balance sheet item on the Financial Accounts’ household wealth table (Table B.101.h), for each of four percentile groups of wealth: the top 1 percent, the next 9 percent (i.e., 90th to 99th percentile), the next 40 percent (50th to 90th percentile), and the bottom half (below the 50th percentile). The quarterly frequency makes the data useful for studying the business cycle dynamics of wealth concentration–which are typically difficult to

Topics:
V. Ramanan considers the following as important: , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Editor writes Greta Thunberg’s speech on economic growth at London’s Houses of Parliament

Editor writes Median income: US, UK, France and Germany – 50 year trends

Merijn T. Knibbe writes Putting the baby in the tub: unemployment in a neoclassical (?) macro model

Dan Crawford writes Open thread April 23, 2019

Distributional Financial Accounts Of The United States

The Distributional Financial Accounts (DFAs) provide a quarterly measure of the distribution of U.S. household wealth since 1989, based on a comprehensive integration of disaggregated household-level wealth data with official aggregate wealth measures. The data set contains the level and share of each balance sheet item on the Financial Accounts’ household wealth table (Table B.101.h), for each of four percentile groups of wealth: the top 1 percent, the next 9 percent (i.e., 90th to 99th percentile), the next 40 percent (50th to 90th percentile), and the bottom half (below the 50th percentile). The quarterly frequency makes the data useful for studying the business cycle dynamics of wealth concentration–which are typically difficult to observe in lower-frequency data because peaks and troughs often fall between times of measurement. These data will be updated about 10 or 11 weeks after the end of each quarter, making them a timely measure of the distribution of wealth.

Also check the FEDS note and the working paper linked on the right in the Federal Reserve site.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *