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Mario Seccareccia and Marc Lavoie — Central Banks, Secular Stagnation, And Loanable Funds

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Mario Seccareccia and Marc Lavoie — Central Banks, Secular Stagnation, And Loanable FundsMario Seccareccia and Marc Lavoie comment on Larry Summers’ recent shift on his view of fiscal policy:… At the time [2013], however, he still sought to explain this new normalcy of secular stagnation in terms of interest rate rigidity.Now, however, he seems to have abandoned that view altogether and has embraced Keynesian and post-Keynesian ideas originating with the General Theory. For instance, nowhere in the article by Summers and Stansbury is there mention of the negative natural rate as the explanation for an incapacity of central bankers to deal with secular stagnation. Is that because he has now abandoned the loanable funds theory, which remains at the core of mainstream thinking and to which he

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Mario Seccareccia and Marc Lavoie — Central Banks, Secular Stagnation, And Loanable Funds

Mario Seccareccia and Marc Lavoie comment on Larry Summers’ recent shift on his view of fiscal policy:

… At the time [2013], however, he still sought to explain this new normalcy of secular stagnation in terms of interest rate rigidity.

Now, however, he seems to have abandoned that view altogether and has embraced Keynesian and post-Keynesian ideas originating with the General Theory. For instance, nowhere in the article by Summers and Stansbury is there mention of the negative natural rate as the explanation for an incapacity of central bankers to deal with secular stagnation. Is that because he has now abandoned the loanable funds theory, which remains at the core of mainstream thinking and to which he had previously subscribed? Nor do he and his coauthor suggest now that activist fiscal policy to combat secular stagnation is needed as a temporary measure to kick-start an economy stuck in a liquidity trap.

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