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Tag Archives: Economics in Two Lessons

Economics in Two Lessons, reviewed

A couple of reviews of Economics in Two Lessons have come out, from opposite ends of the political spectrum. The more interesting is Max Sawicky’s in Jacobin. Sawicky does a great job in summarising the key ideas in the book. His is probably the best review so far for non-economists to get an understanding of the main themes. Given the Jacobin audience, the key question is “Why should a socialist read a book about markets?” As Sawicky observes, the answer is easy for socialists...

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Economics in Two Lessons, by Captain Haddock?

Last week, I did a couple of events in Melbourne for Economics in Two Lessons. One was at Readings in Hawthorn, where my old friend and colleague Al Watson kindly introduced me. The other was at the University of Melbourne, organized by the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, of which I’ve been a member for 40 years now. Max Corden, Australia’s greatest living economist, was going to give the talk there, but was unfortunately taken ill. Another old friend and...

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Book launch in Melbourne (please plug!)

The Melbourne launch for Economics in Two Lessons, will be at Readings Hawthorn Wednesday 17 July and also at University House, Melbourne Uni, 4-6 pm Friday 19 July. Free, no booking required. It looks as if there have been some problems with the publicity, so if anyone can share this with Melbourne friends likely to be interested, I’d be very grateful. Like this:Like Loading...

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Gleebooks Tomorrow

I’ll be doing the Sydney launch of my new book, Economics in Two Lessons at Gleebooks tomorrow (Thursday 27 June). I’ll be talking to the always insightful Peter Martin, so it should be a great event. Details here. Last night’s Brisbane launch, at Avid Reader with Paul Barclay (ABC Radio, Big Ideas) was very successful Less empty space than at Trump’s inauguration!Share this:Like this:Like Loading...

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Radio appearances

I’m doing a run of radio interviews this week, including A discussion of Economics In Two Lessons with Nick Rheinburger, morning presenter for ABC IllawarraA talk about the history of Australian farming, with Annabelle Quince of Rear Vision, the history program on ABC RNA discussion of the resurgence of socialism with Tom Switzer on ABC RN Between The LinesThe first interview should go to air on Thursday morning. I’m not sure about the other two Share this:Like this:Like Loading......

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Book events this week

Two big book events for Economics in Two Lessons coming up this week. On Tuesday, I’ll be at Avid Reader in Brisbane, talking to Paul Barclay. On Thursday, it’s Gleebooks in Sydney, talking to Peter Martin. Share this:Like this:Like Loading...

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Economics in Two Lessons, reviewed

The first proper[1] review of Economics in Two Lessons has appeared, in Inside Story. It’s by Richard Holden[2] and really gets the point of the book. The final paras: Chapters twelve to sixteen deal with what policymakers should do, and here Quiggin’s passion is evident. Moreover, what comes through perhaps more than anything is a sense of balance. There’s what we might want to do and then there’s what the immutable laws of economics — so neatly laid down in the preceding...

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Coming events

I’ve got quite a few events coming up in the next couple of weeks.* On 13 and 14 May, I’m running a workshop at the University of Queensland on Epistemic & Personal Transformation:Dealing with the Unknowable and Unimaginable. Details here.* On Thursday 16 May, I’ll be at ANU for the official Australian launch of Economics in Two Lessons.  Details are here. If campaigning permits, Andrew Leigh will say a few words about the book. There will be a launch at Avid Reader in Brisbane...

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Was Hazlitt an Austrian economist?

Reviews of Economics in Two Lessons are starting to come in. Here’s one, favorable but not rapturous from Diane Coyle. Another, from David Gordon at the Mises Institute is, not surprisingly, more negative. The main (though not the only) complaint is that I treat Hazlitt as a One Lesson neoclassical economist. More precisely, in relation to opportunity cost “[Quiggin] applies the concept as it is used in neoclassical economics, but Hazlitt was an Austrian and does not use the...

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