Friday , February 21 2020
Home / EconoSpeak / Goodbye To The Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope

Goodbye To The Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope

Summary:
Sometime today, January 30, 2020 the plug will be pulled and the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope will cease to operate.  It has been in operation since late August, 2003.  It will be succeeded next yeat hopefully be a enew infrared space telescope named for James Webb.Serving as the Chief  Scientist for this telescope has been the main life work of my brother-in-law, Michael W. Werner, who has since 1990 worked on it out of the Jet Propulsion Lab at Caltech.  He had stepped down as its administrator a few years ago, but was still working on projects associated with it, and will continue to do so as data will still need analyzing, and the forthcoming James Webb telescope will need guidance.The many achievements of this telescope have been described and pictured in the excellent book

Topics:
[email protected] considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Eric Kramer writes Bargaining power, progressive maximalism, and Medicare for All

Frances Coppola writes A tale of two halves

Lars Pålsson Syll writes On randomization and regression (wonkish)

Credit Writedowns writes Credit Writedowns 1970-01-01 00:00:00

Sometime today, January 30, 2020 the plug will be pulled and the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope will cease to operate.  It has been in operation since late August, 2003.  It will be succeeded next yeat hopefully be a enew infrared space telescope named for James Webb.

Serving as the Chief  Scientist for this telescope has been the main life work of my brother-in-law, Michael W. Werner, who has since 1990 worked on it out of the Jet Propulsion Lab at Caltech.  He had stepped down as its administrator a few years ago, but was still working on projects associated with it, and will continue to do so as data will still need analyzing, and the forthcoming James Webb telescope will need guidance.

The many achievements of this telescope have been described and pictured in the excellent book Michael and Peter Eisenhart published this last year with Princeton University Press, More Things in the Heavens: How Infrared Astronomy is Expanding Our View of the Universe, which I highly recommend.

Barkley Rosser

rosserjb@jmu.edu
I remember how loud it was. I was a young Economics undergraduate, and most professors didn’t really slam points home the way Dr. Rosser did. He would bang on the table and throw things around the classroom. Not for the faint of heart, but he definitely kept my attention and made me smile. It is hard to not smile around J. Barkley Rosser, especially when he gets going on economic theory. The passion comes through and encourages you to come along with it in a truly contagious way. After meeting him, it is as if you can just tell that anybody who knows that much and has that much to say deserves your attention.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *