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Economics Of Race And Other Economics For Others

Summary:
Do economists have anything to say about racism in the United States? Some do. The Review of Black Political Economy, for example, exists. Other groups in the United States are often thought of as marginalized. I have written about women in economics before. As usual, I want to mention the existence of the International Association for Feminist Economics and their journal Feminist Economics. I also note the existence of Queer Economics: A Reader for those economists that might be of a questioning bent. Discourse in many academic disciplines about the Other often draw on post-modernism, post-structuralism, and other scary stuff. Some economists have attempted to extend Marxism to engage with postmodernism. Although I have read a bit of David Ruccio and Jack Amariglio, I do not know

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Do economists have anything to say about racism in the United States? Some do. The Review of Black Political Economy, for example, exists.

Other groups in the United States are often thought of as marginalized. I have written about women in economics before. As usual, I want to mention the existence of the International Association for Feminist Economics and their journal Feminist Economics. I also note the existence of Queer Economics: A Reader for those economists that might be of a questioning bent.

Discourse in many academic disciplines about the Other often draw on post-modernism, post-structuralism, and other scary stuff. Some economists have attempted to extend Marxism to engage with postmodernism. Although I have read a bit of David Ruccio and Jack Amariglio, I do not know much about this. I suppose the journal Rethinking Marxism would be worth exploring if you want to know more.

I also do not know much about certain fields, such as development economics, economics of education, labor economics, and urban economics. But I would expect to find much more in their journals relevant to our current sad times than I would in the American Economic Review or the so-called Journal of Political Economy.

None of this has anything to say about whether or not some tenured economists at Chicago are ignorant, reactionary, and full of ressentiment.

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