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Private Truths, Public Lies In Mainstream Economics?

Summary:
I sometimes wonder if most mainstream economists think that most of what they were taught, teach, and research are some combination of false, incoherent, and useless for understanding actually existing capitalism. But they go along out of some sense of professionalism and a belief that their colleagues do not share their views. That is many privately think they are a minority of one, but publically espouse the orthodoxy. As far as professionalism goes, I suppose some believe that those who go on from their microeconomics class, for example, are expected to have been exposed to certain material. I would hope that some question the ethics of not letting the students know that they are being taught one approach, named marginalism, and other approaches exist. Maybe one of these days, I

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I sometimes wonder if most mainstream economists think that most of what they were taught, teach, and research are some combination of false, incoherent, and useless for understanding actually existing capitalism. But they go along out of some sense of professionalism and a belief that their colleagues do not share their views. That is many privately think they are a minority of one, but publically espouse the orthodoxy.

As far as professionalism goes, I suppose some believe that those who go on from their microeconomics class, for example, are expected to have been exposed to certain material. I would hope that some question the ethics of not letting the students know that they are being taught one approach, named marginalism, and other approaches exist.

Maybe one of these days, I will read Timur Kuran's book.

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