Tuesday , January 22 2019
Home / Progressive Economics Forum / Supportive housing for persons with serious mental health challenges

Supportive housing for persons with serious mental health challenges

Summary:
I’ve recently written a ‘top 10’ review of a new book on supportive housing—i.e., subsidized housing with social work support—for persons with serious mental health challenges. The book’s an anthology that was edited by three Ontario-based researchers. A key questions that emerges in the book is: Should such housing be owned and operated by for-profit providers, or by non-profit providers? An advantage of non-profit ownership, in my opinion, is that a non-profit entity eventually owns the asset. My full review can be found here. Enjoy and share:

Topics:
Nick Falvo considers the following as important: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Vivian Labrie writes Statistics Canada’s Ongoing Consultation about the Market Basket Measure Needs Recalibration

Nick Falvo writes An update on Canada’s National Housing Strategy

Frances Coppola writes Mental health and homelessness

Edgardo Sepulveda writes Rent Control in Ontario

I’ve recently written a ‘top 10’ review of a new book on supportive housing—i.e., subsidized housing with social work support—for persons with serious mental health challenges. The book’s an anthology that was edited by three Ontario-based researchers.

A key questions that emerges in the book is: Should such housing be owned and operated by for-profit providers, or by non-profit providers? An advantage of non-profit ownership, in my opinion, is that a non-profit entity eventually owns the asset.

My full review can be found here.

Enjoy and share:

Nick Falvo
Director of Research & Data, Calgary Homeless Foundation. Economist. Research Associate, Carleton University Centre for Community Innovation. Tweets are my own.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *