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Interview in PRESS TV news (11-3-2021) on police brutality in Greece

Summary:
I made a short comment in PRESS TV news (11-3-2021) on the recent incidences of police brutality and the popular revulsion against the policies of the Greek right-wing government. Following are (a) the summary of the comment and (b) the video links of the News Widespread popular revulsion against the policies of the Right-wing government These events are the result of the accumulated popular anger against the right-wing government and its policies which can be codified in two things: 1) economic policies in favour of big capital and 2) authoritarianism and police repression Economic hardship as the EU austerity policies have been coupled with the economic recession related to the COVID-19 epidemic. Fiscal support through government aid packages is limited and the

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I made a short comment in PRESS TV news (11-3-2021) on the recent incidences of police brutality and the popular revulsion against the policies of the Greek right-wing government.

Following are (a) the summary of the comment and (b) the video links of the News

Widespread popular revulsion against the policies of the Right-wing government

These events are the result of the accumulated popular anger against the right-wing government and its policies which can be codified in two things: 1) economic policies in favour of big capital and 2) authoritarianism and police repression

Economic hardship as the EU austerity policies have been coupled with the economic recession related to the COVID-19 epidemic.

Fiscal support through government aid packages is limited and the great majority of the monies go the big capitalists; particularly those associated with the right-wing government. Only small portions trickle down to the workers and the popular classes.

The government has failed also utterly to tackle the COVID-19 epidemic as it is on the rise again without any signs of retreating.

On top of that the right-wing uses the epidemic as a pretext to forfeit the democratic liberties and prohibit demonstrations in ways reminiscent of the 1970s military dictatorship.

The police brutality has been carefully directed by the government and also the US who have a particular role in this as the minister of Public Order has well-known relationship to them.

They expected that this will break popular discontent and impose subservience.

The incident in Nea Smirni is the culmination of a series of similar barbaric policy actions all over the country. Particularly youth is being branded by the Right wing as ‘the social enemy’ and are targeted by the police. In the universities there the government’s attempt to put police units inside the campuses despite the almost unanimous opposition of the students and the majority of the academics.

As usually happens in such cases, the right-wing government and its patrons overestimated.

Students’ marches are taking place almost daily in most big cities. Yesterday’s events marked a turning point as it was the people of a metropolitan district and the local youth (outside the university) that erupted.

The current climate is very heavy for the right-wing government as the majority of the people are disgusted with its authoritarian policies and actions. This makes almost impossible the government’s plan to go to a sudden double election at some point in 2021 in order to extend its time in power.

https://www.urmedium.com/c/presstv/67440

Stavros Mavroudeas
He is currently Professor of Political Economy at the Department of Social Policy of Panteion University. He was previously Professor of Political Economy at the Department of Economics of the University of Macedonia. He studied at the Economics Department of the National Kapodistriakon University of Athens, from where he received his BA Economics (1985 - First Class Honours).

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