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Home / Tag Archives: Economic History (page 7)

Tag Archives: Economic History

Public Policy and Homelessness: The Case of Calgary

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Social Housing in BC, AB and QC (1975-2015)

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How Housing Policy Benefits from a Socioeconomic Perspective

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Trump’s Election Win Shows That The Bank Bailouts And Quantitative Easing Have Failed

To all who argued the financial world would’ve collapsed without the bailouts: The political world is collapsing now because of the bailouts — Emanuel Derman (@EmanuelDerman) June 25, 2016 The bigger picture of the early 21st century follows: Western nations experienced a massive blowout bubble of leverage, irrational exuberance, and Hayekian pseudo-money creation. Yet this money was not going to overwhelmingly productive causes. The real output of the Western world did not follow...

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A Short Account of The Rise of Neoliberalism

By David FieldsBetween roughly the early 1940’s and early 1970’s, the financial architecture of the world economy centered on a US engineered Keynesian accumulation agenda, as a response to the devastation wrought by the Great Depression. The capitalist institutional structure, or social structure of accumulation (Kotz, McDonough, and Reich, 1994), rested on finance being subservient to the promotion of  industrial enterprise. With socially-engineered capital-labor compromises in...

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Economists don’t read (enough) books

So Ann Petiffor twitted a link to a post on why economists do not read Polanyi's The Great Transformation (or the other GT; yes the one is Keynes' General Theory) The author, Marko Grdesic, basically suggests that economists do not read books, period.* I would add, let alone Polanyi that was always at the fringes of mainstream economics. He estimates that about 3 percent of economists have read Polanyi. That reminded me of a story that Eichengreen had told me about a course he taught...

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Obituaries: Nathan Rosenberg (1927-2015)

E-mail was sent to the Society for the History of Economics (SHOE) informing that Nathan Rosenberg has passed away. Have not seen an obituary, but will link later. He was the author How the West Grew Rich, that suggested that freedom was central for creating the supply-side conditions for economic growth in Western Europe. Several heterodox neo-Schumpeterians used his work, in particular Inside the Black Box. Personally I prefer demand-driven stories, including for technology. At any...

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Correction or Crisis?

After almost seven years of relative calm and stability, a stock market crash is finally upon us. This is a very predictable crash stemming from a very widely known cause. Hundreds of analysts including myself — following the trail illuminated by Michael Pettis — have for a long time been banging on about a Chinese slowdown gathering an uncontrollable momentum, sending China into a panic, and infecting global markets. What’s less clear yet is whether this is a correction or a crisis. My...

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On Trade Unions & Inequality

This chart is pretty wow: Florence Jaumotte and Carolina Osorio Buitron of the International Monetary Fund have some ideas about how the correlation may have been caused: The main channels through which labor market institutions affect income inequality are the following: Wage dispersion: Unionization and minimum wages are usually thought to reduce inequality by helping equalize the distribution of wages, and economic research confirms this. Unemployment: Some economists argue that while...

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