Friday , October 7 2022
Home / Video / The Minsky Models of Modern Monetary Theory 11 #TMMOMMT

The Minsky Models of Modern Monetary Theory 11 #TMMOMMT

Summary:
Eleventh of twelve videos showing the construction of models of the monetary aspects of Modern Monetary Theory in Minsky. Download Minsky from https://sourceforge.net/projects/minsky/files/beta%20builds/ and support Minsky's development at https://www.patreon.com/hpcoder/ for as little as a month

Topics:
Steve Keen considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Lars Pålsson Syll writes Statistical models and the assumptions on which they build

Lars Pålsson Syll writes BTO

Mike Norman writes Bill Mitchell — RBA tom foolery continues while spending continues unabated

WARREN MOSLER writes CB gold purchases, heavy trucks, total vehicle sales, mortgage purchase applications, new homes under construction

Eleventh of twelve videos showing the construction of models of the monetary aspects of Modern Monetary Theory in Minsky. Download Minsky from https://sourceforge.net/projects/minsky/files/beta%20builds/ and support Minsky's development at https://www.patreon.com/hpcoder/ for as little as $1 a month
Steve Keen
Steve Keen (born 28 March 1953) is an Australian-born, British-based economist and author. He considers himself a post-Keynesian, criticising neoclassical economics as inconsistent, unscientific and empirically unsupported. The major influences on Keen's thinking about economics include John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, Hyman Minsky, Piero Sraffa, Augusto Graziani, Joseph Alois Schumpeter, Thorstein Veblen, and François Quesnay.

4 comments

  1. Harry Kiralfy Broe

  2. It all makes perfect sense. We know the economy has been financialized via the neoliberal project of the last 40 years. It's a tautology that the emergent capital markets which dominate the global economy have captured government. Prof Keen demonstrates here there is no need to monetize government spending through "borrowing" from private markets via the sale of government securities. So why do governments sell bonds? Simple: Capital markets demand them.

  3. Thanks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *