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Talk to the Oxford Economics Society on macro without micro and with energy

Summary:
This video starts with the "green-room" chatter between myself and Oscar Brisset, who is Co-President of the Oxford Economics Society. The presentation proper starts about two minutes in. Oscar's sound feed is poor, because this was recorded on my PC, but mine is pretty clear. It's an intense one-hour lecture, covering material that should really be done over a dozen or so lectures, so if you'd like to follow up on it, please check this out on my Patreon page https://www.patreon.com/profstevekeen, where I'll include the Powerpoint file on which the lecture was based.

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This video starts with the "green-room" chatter between myself and Oscar Brisset, who is Co-President of the Oxford Economics Society. The presentation proper starts about two minutes in. Oscar's sound feed is poor, because this was recorded on my PC, but mine is pretty clear.



It's an intense one-hour lecture, covering material that should really be done over a dozen or so lectures, so if you'd like to follow up on it, please check this out on my Patreon page https://www.patreon.com/profstevekeen, where I'll include the Powerpoint file on which the lecture was based.
Steve Keen
Steve Keen (born 28 March 1953) is an Australian-born, British-based economist and author. He considers himself a post-Keynesian, criticising neoclassical economics as inconsistent, unscientific and empirically unsupported. The major influences on Keen's thinking about economics include John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, Hyman Minsky, Piero Sraffa, Augusto Graziani, Joseph Alois Schumpeter, Thorstein Veblen, and François Quesnay.

2 comments

  1. "so far beyond post-modern irony… I suggest 'post-real' " is probably the best take I've ever heard

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