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Kingston Becoming an Economist L10: Why the money multiplier model is false 2/2

Summary:
This completes the lecture; I had to make the screen resolution lower so that the Godley Table could be read by students. Of course I’d rather be able to magnify the Table within the program, but that takes money for software development which at the moment I don’t have. You may be able to help ...

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This completes the lecture; I had to make the screen resolution lower so that the Godley Table could be read by students. Of course I’d rather be able to magnify the Table within the program, but that takes money for software development which at the moment I don’t have.



You may be able to help on this front though, in a few month’s time, when I launch an appeal on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/. My videos will no longer be freely available, but as little as $1 a month to see them will mean you are supporting my research, not merely observing the results. And with your help, I will take my work much further than I would ever be able to do without it.



Steve Keen
Steve Keen (born 28 March 1953) is an Australian-born, British-based economist and author. He considers himself a post-Keynesian, criticising neoclassical economics as inconsistent, unscientific and empirically unsupported. The major influences on Keen's thinking about economics include John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, Hyman Minsky, Piero Sraffa, Augusto Graziani, Joseph Alois Schumpeter, Thorstein Veblen, and François Quesnay.

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