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10 Years of Naked Keynesianism

Summary:
A day like today back in 2011. First post here. I was at the University of Utah back then, and blogging had been going for a while, but nothing that was close to the kind of heterodox economics that mattered to me. Also, the Review of Keynesian Economics (ROKE) did not exist yet. More than 2000 posts and 4 million visits later the blog has certainly passed its peak. Interestingly enough the post with more visits is about Venezuela, but the second is less of a surprise, the one on the capital debates. Then there are popular posts on Brexit, Capitalism and MMT. It is less an instrument for teaching to me know than it was at the beginning, and I have often thought of just stop blogging. Yet at different times when I debated what to do, I would get an email, or meet a student at a conference

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10 Years of Naked Keynesianism
A day like today back in 2011. First post here. I was at the University of Utah back then, and blogging had been going for a while, but nothing that was close to the kind of heterodox economics that mattered to me. Also, the Review of Keynesian Economics (ROKE) did not exist yet. More than 2000 posts and 4 million visits later the blog has certainly passed its peak. Interestingly enough the post with more visits is about Venezuela, but the second is less of a surprise, the one on the capital debates. Then there are popular posts on Brexit, Capitalism and MMT. It is less an instrument for teaching to me know than it was at the beginning, and I have often thought of just stop blogging. Yet at different times when I debated what to do, I would get an email, or meet a student at a conference that would tell me that this blog had been the main, and sometimes the first source of heterodox ideas they encountered. Or friends that told me they used it in classes, or asked to post something. It became somewhat of a public good for at least part of the heterodox community. So the blog lingers. Thanks to all my co-bloggers, and the readers!

Matias Vernengo
Econ Prof at @BucknellU Co-editor of ROKE & Co-Editor in Chief of the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

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