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Failure of Turing’s conjecture

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From Asad Zaman Note that this is a very POSITIVIST idea — if the surface appearances match, that is all that matters.         I quote a passage from Pearl: The Book of Why, which provides a gentle introduction to the newly developed field (largely by him) of causal inference via path diagrams: In 1950, Alan Turing asked what it would mean for a computer to think like a human. He suggested a practical test, which he called “the imitation game,” but every AI researcher since then has called it the “Turing test.” For all practical purposes, a computer could be called a thinking machine if an ordinary human, communicating with the computer by typewriter, could not tell whether he was talking with a human or a computer. Turing was very confident that this was within the realm of

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from Asad Zaman

Note that this is a very POSITIVIST idea —
if the surface appearances match, that is all that matters.

        Failure of Turing’s conjecture

I quote a passage from Pearl: The Book of Why, which provides a gentle introduction to the newly developed field (largely by him) of causal inference via path diagrams:

In 1950, Alan Turing asked what it would mean for a computer to think like a human. He suggested a practical test, which he called “the imitation game,” but every AI researcher since then has called it the “Turing test.” For all practical purposes, a computer could be called a thinking machine if an ordinary human, communicating with the computer by typewriter, could not tell whether he was talking with a human or a computer. Turing was very confident that this was within the realm of feasibility. “I believe that in about fifty years’ time . . . . read more

Asad Zaman
Physician executive. All opinions are my personal. It is okay for me to be confused as I’m learning every day. Judge me and be confused as well.

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