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Ravel For Corporate Data

Summary:
I use Ravel to analyze economic data, but I first designed it to make analyzing corporate data easier. Since then, Pivot Tables have become the norm. This video shows how to use Ravel instead of a Pivot Table to analyze some mock corporate transactional data. I'm releasing the current beta of Ravel to my Patreon supporters on Sunday March 28th, and I would love some of them to use it to analyze their corporate data, and tell us how it goes. There are shortcomings to the current beta--notably, we can't currently aggregate from, say, Quarter to Year, or State to Country. But that will come in a later beta release.

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I use Ravel to analyze economic data, but I first designed it to make analyzing corporate data easier. Since then, Pivot Tables have become the norm. This video shows how to use Ravel instead of a Pivot Table to analyze some mock corporate transactional data.



I'm releasing the current beta of Ravel to my Patreon supporters on Sunday March 28th, and I would love some of them to use it to analyze their corporate data, and tell us how it goes.



There are shortcomings to the current beta--notably, we can't currently aggregate from, say, Quarter to Year, or State to Country. But that will come in a later beta release.
Steve Keen
Steve Keen (born 28 March 1953) is an Australian-born, British-based economist and author. He considers himself a post-Keynesian, criticising neoclassical economics as inconsistent, unscientific and empirically unsupported. The major influences on Keen's thinking about economics include John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, Hyman Minsky, Piero Sraffa, Augusto Graziani, Joseph Alois Schumpeter, Thorstein Veblen, and François Quesnay.

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