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Using Ravel To Interpret Covid Data

Summary:
On March 28th--my 68th birthday--I'm giving a free copy of Ravel my supporters on Patreon (at either my site https://www.patreon.com/profstevekeen or Minsky's site https://www.patreon.com/hpcoder/). It's a pre-release version, so there are bugs (some of which turn up in this demonstration) and missing features. But even as it is, Ravel makes it far easier to load and analyse multi-dimensional data than if you used a spreadsheet like Excel, or even a Pivot Table. This quick demonstration shows loading a CSV file into Ravel, then plotting a significant variable over time (total Covid-19 cases per million) for five countries (China, Australia, The Netherlands, Thailand, and the UK), both over the whole period from January 2020 till March 2021, and at particular days (from February 15 till

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On March 28th--my 68th birthday--I'm giving a free copy of Ravel my supporters on Patreon (at either my site https://www.patreon.com/profstevekeen or Minsky's site https://www.patreon.com/hpcoder/). It's a pre-release version, so there are bugs (some of which turn up in this demonstration) and missing features. But even as it is, Ravel makes it far easier to load and analyse multi-dimensional data than if you used a spreadsheet like Excel, or even a Pivot Table.



This quick demonstration shows loading a CSV file into Ravel, then plotting a significant variable over time (total Covid-19 cases per million) for five countries (China, Australia, The Netherlands, Thailand, and the UK), both over the whole period from January 2020 till March 2021, and at particular days (from February 15 till about June) on a day-by-day basis.
Steve Keen
Steve Keen (born 28 March 1953) is an Australian-born, British-based economist and author. He considers himself a post-Keynesian, criticising neoclassical economics as inconsistent, unscientific and empirically unsupported. The major influences on Keen's thinking about economics include John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, Hyman Minsky, Piero Sraffa, Augusto Graziani, Joseph Alois Schumpeter, Thorstein Veblen, and François Quesnay.

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