Sunday , September 25 2022
Home / Mike Norman Economics / Robert Skidelsky – The Monetarist fantasy is over

Robert Skidelsky – The Monetarist fantasy is over

Summary:
It will be interesting to see what Boris Johnson does, he seems to be more pragmatic and less dogmatic than other Conservatives.I've read he wants to keep his new voters, so he has shifted slightly to the left.The forced resignation of the United Kingdom’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sajid Javid, is the latest sign that macroeconomic policy is being upended, and not only in the UK. In addition to completing the ritual burial of the austerity policies pursued by UK governments since 2010, Javid’s departure on February 13 has broader significance. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is determined to overcome Treasury resistance to his vast spending ambitions. The last time a UK prime minister tried to open the government spending taps to such an extent was in 1964, when Labour’s Harold Wilson

Topics:
Mike Norman considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Robert Vienneau writes Saul Kripke (1940 – 2022)

run75441 writes “Whacking Labor” to Fight Inflation and Fix the Economy

NewDealdemocrat writes Focusing on the short end of the yield curve

Angry Bear writes Potential Voting Machine Issues (tampering) in Some States

It will be interesting to see what Boris Johnson does, he seems to be more pragmatic and less dogmatic than other Conservatives.

I've read he wants to keep his new voters, so he has shifted slightly to the left.

The forced resignation of the United Kingdom’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sajid Javid, is the latest sign that macroeconomic policy is being upended, and not only in the UK. In addition to completing the ritual burial of the austerity policies pursued by UK governments since 2010, Javid’s departure on February 13 has broader significance.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is determined to overcome Treasury resistance to his vast spending ambitions. The last time a UK prime minister tried to open the government spending taps to such an extent was in 1964, when Labour’s Harold Wilson established the Department of Economic Affairs to counter Treasury hostility to public investment. Following the 1966 sterling crisis, however, the hawk-eyed Treasury re-established control, and the DEA was soon abolished. The Treasury, the oldest and most cynical department of government, knows how to bide its time.

Robert Skidelsky - The Monetarist fantasy is over

Mike Norman
Mike Norman is an economist and veteran trader whose career has spanned over 30 years on Wall Street. He is a former member and trader on the CME, NYMEX, COMEX and NYFE and he managed money for one of the largest hedge funds and ran a prop trading desk for Credit Suisse.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *