Saturday , September 26 2020
Home / Naked Keynesianism / Housing and Inequality in Utah

Housing and Inequality in Utah

Summary:
From the recent report, written to a great extent by David Fields: Rising housing costs and stagnating real wages are the primary causes of worsening housing affordability in Utah. From 2009 to 2016 real income only grew at 0.31% per year while rent crept upward at a rate of 1.03% per year in 2017 constant dollars. Now, more than 183,000 low-income Utah households pay more than half their income for rent, becoming more likely to be evicted and moving closer to homelessness. Housing has not received as much coverage in the discussions about inequality, and this is well wroth reading.

Topics:
Matias Vernengo considers the following as important: ,

This could be interesting, too:

Nick Falvo writes Homelessness in canada could rise due to recession

James Kwak writes The COVID-19 Economy: What Can We Do?

Ann Pettifor writes Inequality and Morbid Symptoms of a Financialised System

Ann Pettifor writes Put Fairness at the Heart of Finance

Housing and Inequality in Utah

From the recent report, written to a great extent by David Fields:
Rising housing costs and stagnating real wages are the primary causes of worsening housing affordability in Utah. From 2009 to 2016 real income only grew at 0.31% per year while rent crept upward at a rate of 1.03% per year in 2017 constant dollars. Now, more than 183,000 low-income Utah households pay more than half their income for rent, becoming more likely to be evicted and moving closer to homelessness.
Housing has not received as much coverage in the discussions about inequality, and this is well wroth reading. 
Matias Vernengo
Econ Prof at @BucknellU Co-editor of ROKE & Co-Editor in Chief of the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *