Wednesday , September 22 2021
Home / Mike Norman Economics / Bill Mitchell— The BIS should be defunded and then dissolved

Bill Mitchell— The BIS should be defunded and then dissolved

Summary:
On June 24, 2018, the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) released their – Annual Economic Report 2018 – which contains their latest analysis of the global economy including the risks they think the current growth process faces. It is full of myth and like previous statements from the BIS it only serves to perpetuate the policy mentalities that caused the global financial crisis. These multilateral organisations (including the BIS, IMF, World Bank, OECD etc) have become the harbingers of the neoliberal ideology. In doing so, they have breached their original charter. They should be dissolved and replaced with new institutions within a revised international framework. We sketched that framework in our current book – Reclaiming the State: A Progressive Vision of Sovereignty for a

Topics:
Mike Norman considers the following as important: , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Matias Vernengo writes Laissez-faire policies, self-adjusting market system, and neoliberalism

Matias Vernengo writes The end of Friedmanomics?

Sergio Cesaratto writes Audio-video del Seminario “Dopo le crisi. Un dialogo interdisciplinare sul futuro dell’Europa”

Robert Vienneau writes Elsewhere

On June 24, 2018, the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) released their – Annual Economic Report 2018 – which contains their latest analysis of the global economy including the risks they think the current growth process faces. It is full of myth and like previous statements from the BIS it only serves to perpetuate the policy mentalities that caused the global financial crisis. These multilateral organisations (including the BIS, IMF, World Bank, OECD etc) have become the harbingers of the neoliberal ideology. In doing so, they have breached their original charter. They should be dissolved and replaced with new institutions within a revised international framework. We sketched that framework in our current book – Reclaiming the State: A Progressive Vision of Sovereignty for a Post-Neoliberal World (Pluto Books, 2017).
Bill Mitchell – billy blog
The BIS should be defunded and then dissolved
Bill Mitchell | Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE), at University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

See also
"The powers of financial capitalism had (a) far-reaching aim, nothing less than to create a world system of financial control in private hands able to dominate the political system of each country and the economy of the world as a whole. This system was to be controlled in a feudalist fashion by the central banks of the world acting in concert, by secret agreements arrived at in frequent meetings and conferences. The apex of the systems was to be the Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, a private bank owned and controlled by the world's central banks which were themselves private corporations. Each central bank... sought to dominate its government by its ability to control Treasury loans, to manipulate foreign exchanges, to influence the level of economic activity in the country, and to influence cooperative politicians by subsequent economic rewards in the business world."   
Carroll Quigley, Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1966, VII, page 324.

Carroll Quigley (1910-1977), Professor of History at Georgetown University School of Foreign Relations, member of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), and mentor to Bill Clinton. Quigley was writing from the vantage of an insider.

This quote begins a section of the chapter on the BIS. Quigley asserts that historically the BIS was an extension of banker control of international finance. The BIS, IMF, World Bank, and other influential international institutions were created by a Western elite as a mechanism of global financial and economic dominance. The East and Global South is now pushing back on this. This is one of the issues in demands for multilateralism and multipolarism.

Tragedy and Hope and other Quigley works are available at archive.org and also at his site.



Mike Norman
Mike Norman is an economist and veteran trader whose career has spanned over 30 years on Wall Street. He is a former member and trader on the CME, NYMEX, COMEX and NYFE and he managed money for one of the largest hedge funds and ran a prop trading desk for Credit Suisse.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *