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Tag Archives: fiscal policy

Ten things to know about the 2023-24 Alberta budget

On 28 February 2023, the Danielle Smith government tabled Alberta’s 2023-2024 budget. Projecting a $2.4 billion surplus for the coming fiscal year, the budget announced some spending increases; but many are effectively cuts when one accounts for both inflation and population growth. Here are 10 things to know: The budget itself contains projections pertaining to inflation and population change. In the upcoming fiscal year, the budget projects 3.3% inflation (using...

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Settling the public sector pay disputes now – modest cost, big benefits

Another week goes by.  Hundreds of thousands of workers, mainly public sector, on strike last week, and again this week. Pay deals way below inflation. Zero movement from government.  Continuing disruption and decay. Why can’t a settlement be reached? Just before Christmas, Prime Minister Sunak told us “I want to make sure that we reduce inflation and part of that is being responsible in setting public sector pay..” On 1st February, Mr Sunak’s Official Spokesman said “We want to have...

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Settling the public sector pay disputes now – modest cost, big benefits

Another week goes by.  Hundreds of thousands of workers, mainly public sector, on strike last week, and again this week. Pay deals way below inflation. Zero movement from government.  Continuing disruption and decay. Why can’t a settlement be reached?Just before Christmas, Prime Minister Sunak told us“I want to make sure that we reduce inflation and part of that is being responsible in setting public sector pay..”On 1st February, Mr Sunak’s Official Spokesman said“We want to have further...

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Settling the public sector pay disputes now – modest cost, big benefits

Another week goes by.  Hundreds of thousands of workers, mainly public sector, on strike last week, and again this week. Pay deals way below inflation. Zero movement from government.  Continuing disruption and decay. Why can’t a settlement be reached?Just before Christmas, Prime Minister Sunak told us“I want to make sure that we reduce inflation and part of that is being responsible in setting public sector pay..”On 1st February, Mr Sunak’s Official Spokesman said“We want to have further...

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Guest editorial: Homelessness in Canada

I’ve written the guest editorial for a special edition of the International Journal on Homelessness. The guest editorial provides a general overview of homelessness in Canada (and I believe it serves as a helpful stand-alone reading for practitioners, researchers, students and advocates). My guest editorial can be found here (in English): https://ojs.lib.uwo.ca/index.php/ijoh/article/view/14810/11659 My guest editorial can be found here (in French):...

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An Accommodative Fiscal Stance Is Crucial for India

by Lekha Chakraborty and Harikrishnan S. Omicron is a reminder that the COVID-19 pandemic is still not over. This ongoing health crisis should act as a trigger for greater investments in public health in India. Public spending on health by the union government is still below 1 percent of GDP, though the estimate has increased from 0.2 percent of GDP in 2020–21 (revised estimates) to 0.4 percent of GDP in 2021–22 (budget estimates). Strengthening investments in the healthcare sector is...

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On a book by ECB’s economists

An ECB’s Staff Narrative of Two Decades of European Central Banking: a critical review Working Paper n.866 Dicembre 2021Sergio Cesaratto DEPS, USiena Abstract Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis (Rostagno et al. 2021) has three relevant features. The first is its criticism of the absence of an adequate European fiscal policy during the financial crisis. This left the ECB on its own. The second feature concerns the...

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Are Concerns over Growing Federal Government Debt Misplaced?

L. Randall Wray | November 10, 2021 If the global financial crisis (GFC) of the mid-to-late 2000s and the COVID crisis of the past couple of years have taught us anything, it is that Uncle Sam cannot run out of money. During the GFC, the Federal Reserve lent and spent over $29 trillion to bail out the world’s financial system,[1] and then trillions more in various rounds of “unconventional” monetary policy known as quantitative easing.[2] During the COVID crisis, the...

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