Sunday , January 19 2020
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Tag Archives: fiscal policy

Assessing progress on St. John’s Plan to End Homelessness

I’ve written an assessment of the 2014-2019 St. John’s Community Plan to End Homelessness. The full assessment can be found here. Points raised in the assessment include the following: -Newfoundland and Labrador has the highest unemployment rate of any Canadian province. This pulls people into homelessness, while also making it more challenging for the provincial government to finance policy asks (such as subsidized housing with social work support). -People...

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Who Pays the Corporate Income Tax? Don’t believe the IFS

 The AssertionEven before Corbyn launched the Labour Manifesto, the Institute of Fiscal Studies launched its critique of Labour tax policies, asserting that Labour’s proposed tax increases were not limited to the richest,:"The truth is of course that in the end corporation tax is paid by workers, customers or shareholders so would affect many in the population".  On the BBC Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell politely rejected the IFS critique, which in essence asserts that the...

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Ten things to know about the 2019-20 Alberta budget

I’ve just written a ‘top 10’ overview of the recent Alberta budget. Points raised in the post include the following: -The budget lays out a four-year strategy of spending cuts, letting population growth and inflation do much of the heavy lifting. -After one accounts for both population growth and inflation, annual provincial spending in Alberta by 2022 is projected to be 16.2% lower than it was last year. -Alberta remains Canada’s lowest-taxed province. It also...

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Bill Mitchell — Is the British Labour Party aboard the fiscal dominance train – Part 1?

As I type this (Sunday), I am heading to Brighton, England from Edinburgh. We had two sessions in Edinburgh yesterday (Saturday) and it was great to share ideas with some really committed people. We had to dodge a Hollywood closure of the streets (‘Fast and Furious 9 had commandeered the inner city to film a car or two swerving out of control or whatever, and I hope the city received heaps for the inconvenience to its citizens. But, with the direction now south, and tomorrow’s two events...

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The Pivot To Fiscal? — Brian Romanchuk

The final Mario Draghi press conference had him underlining the importance of fiscal policy. Since I am supposed to be working on my slides for my presentation in the panel "MMT: Who is Listening?", one might argue that it looks like a lot of people. However, it is unclear how significant the shift in opinion is from a practical perspective.... Bond Economics The Pivot To Fiscal?Brian Romanchuk

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Is Fiscal The New Monetary? — Nicola Mai, Peder Beck-Friis

Curiously, no mention of MMT. But useful for the analysis showing that monetary policy is not cutting it and that fiscal policy will inevitably gain in prominence. It is now pretty widely recognized that the period of monetarism spearheaded by Milton Friedman (and the Chicago School) as the "successor" of John Maynard Keynes as international policy guru is over. The question now is, who will the new gurus be? Will the pendulum swing back to Cambridge and Wynn Godley?FA — Financial...

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Whither Central Banking? Lawrence H. Summers

In an environment of secular stagnation in the developed economies, central bankers’ ingenuity in loosening monetary policy is exactly what is not needed. What is needed are admissions of impotence, in order to spur efforts by governments to promote demand through fiscal policies and other means. Throwing in the towel (but not endorsing MMT). Politically, this is about control of the Democratic Party after the transition from Clinton-Obama-Third Way. Summers is on the side of the...

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Lawrence Summers On The Failure Of The New Consensus

Lawrence Summers On The Failure Of The New ConsensusLarry Summers has a Twitter thread in which he talks of how the economics profession got it wrong by downgrading fiscal policy. He also concedes to Post-Keynesians:We have come to agree w/ the point long stressed by Post Keynesian economists & recently emphasized by Palley that the role of specific frictions in economic fluctuations should be de-emphasized relative to a more fundamental lack of aggregate demand.The title is the link.

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