Saturday , November 16 2019
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Tag Archives: growth

IPA’s weekly links

Guest post by Jeff Mosenkis of Innovations for Poverty Action. The 26 artifacts, which include statutes and thrones looted by French troops during a military raid against the once powerful West African Kingdom of Dahomey in 1892, are among some of the 5,000 artifacts requested from France by Benin. And that’s just Benin, there are an estimated 90,000 looted African artifacts in France. A holy grail in economic development, and really all of business investment, is figuring out which small...

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Darren Williams — «How Populism Affects Our Business»

Most important, after a 40-year period in which capital has won out decisively over labor, there is much likelihood that global economic policy is to shift back in a much less business-friendly direction. Not only will that weigh on economic growth, but it’s also likely to push inflation higher. And that’s something markets are not currently prepared for. FinenewsDarren Williams: «How Populism Affects Our Business» Darren Williams | Global Economic Research Group for Fixed Income

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Weird Is Normal

This post was originally published on Pieria in December 2013. Since then, the idea that the long-term real equilibrium interest rate must be equal to or lower than the long-term sustainable growth rate has become much more mainstream. I am just amazed that anyone ever thought it could be otherwise. A long-term real interest rate persistently above the sustainable growth rate cannot possibly be an "equilibrium" rate. As I show in this piece, it can only be maintained through rising...

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David F. Ruccio — Poverty and inequality—on a global scale

More numbers sleight of hand. It should perhaps come as no surprise that, as capitalism has been called into question and socialism generated increasing interest during the past decade, capitalism’s defenders have resorted to a long historical view. Look, they say, how capitalist growth has decreased poverty and led to improvements in people’s lives around the globe. Just stick with it and all will eventually be well. That’s why, as Jason Hickel points out, the above infographic, based on...

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Chris Hamilton — The End Of Growth Among “Haves” Dooms Growth Among “Haves” & “Have Nots” Alike

The global economic system is premised on growth, not just any growth, but growth where it matters (economically). However, population growth (the foundation of economic growth) among the high and upper middle income nations of the world is rapidly winding down. As I have outlined previously, total births have been declining among the combined high/upper middle income nations since 1988 and now births are declining everywhere but among the low income nations of the world (HERE). Without...

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Joshua Bateman — Why China is spending billions to develop an army of robots to turbocharge its economy

Chinese President Xi Jinping has called for a robot revolution in manufacturing to boost productivity. Wages in China are rising, and it's becoming harder to compete with cheap labor. An aging population in China also necessitates automation. The working-age population, people age 15 to 64, could drop to 800 million by 2050 from 998 million today. Chinese robotic growth is forecast to exceed 20 percent annually through 2020. Interesting article to read in full. China's socialist ideology...

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Branko Milanovic — Kate Raworth’s economics of miracles

Review of Kate Raworth’s Doughnut economics: Seven ways to think like the 21st-century economist.  Good read. Is Kate Raworth being utopian? I would say that Kate Raworth's work is similar to Mariana Mazzucato's in that they both propose out of the box solutions to addressing contemporary challenges. They are significant in that they are starting points for reflection, inquiry, conversation and debate.  Raworth challenges the growth model of conventional economics and Mazzucato...

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David Pilling — Rethinking Economic Growth: A Review Of “The Growth Delusion”

Conventional economics prioritizes "growth" measured chiefly by per capita real GDP, assuming that increasing per capita real GDP increases the standard of living of a society. However, per capita real GDP is not a metric of the standard of living since it does not include distribution. They becomes crucial as inequality of income and net worth increases. A small segment of the population can be getting better off, while most of the society either languishes or declines. The typical...

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