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Tag Archives: Taxes/regulation

Next Friday could be a very bad day somewhere along the East Coast

Next Friday could be a very bad day somewhere along the East Coast I think I may have mentioned once or twice that I am a nerd, right? So, last year during hurricane season I got hooked on a site called Tropical Tidbits. The neat thing about this site — well, from a nerdy point of view — is that it posts the GFS model forecast, updated every 6 six hours, for the next two weeks! While you normally don’t hear forecasts more than five days out, I noticed...

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Brad DeLong hops aboard the “Employers have a Taboo against raising Wages” bandwagon

Brad DeLong hops aboard the “Employers have a Taboo against raising Wages” bandwagon For Labor Day Prof. Brad DeLong posted a talk on the implications (or not) of the US being near “full employment.” The arguments on a few of the pages will be familiar to readers of this blog: My only significant quibble here is that “Job Openings” rates from both the JOLTS reports and the NFIB (Small Business) survey have been soaring for over 2 years....

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A thought for Labor Day, 2018

(Dan here…better late than not) by New Deal democrat A thought for Labor Day, 2018 US voters will continue to vote for alternating partisan “waves” in Congress, and for “outsiders” however chancey for President, until the problem depicted in the below graph is solved:

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Has Trump Gone Over The Edge On Negotiating With Canada?

Has Trump Gone Over The Edge On Negotiating With Canada? He may well have.  Facing the  deadline for submitting his deal with Mexico to Congress on Friday, he did so.  However, he did so without Canada signed on, the apparently intense negotiations in Washington between Canadian Foreign Minister, Chrystia Freeland and US Trade Representative, Robert Lighthizer having failed to come to an agreement.  With both the Mexican leaders and major Republican...

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Comments on personal consumption expenditures: the September anomaly and the Fed’s 2% inflation ceiliing

Comments on personal consumption expenditures: the September anomaly and the Fed’s 2% inflation ceiliing Let me make a few comments on yesterday’s (Aug. 30) report on personal income and spending. Well, actually, just the spending part for now. First, there is a long-time relationship going back 60 years in the data whereby the YoY% growth in retail sales is higher in the first part of an economic expansion, and lower in the latter part, compared with...

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Corpoate profits after taxes set a new record. But the Fed is worried about wages

Yesterday  (Aug. 29) in the Q2 GDP update corporate profits were reported for the first time. Since corporate profits are one of four long leading indicators identified by Prof. Geoffrey Moore, I have updated my look at them at Seeking Alpha. Usual shameless plug: reading this isn’t just educational, it puts a few pennies in my pocket. But of course corporate profits are a good way to measure how the producer sector is doing compared with...

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House prices continue to rise, exacerbating unaffordability

House prices continue to rise, exacerbating unaffordability Now that we have both the Case Shiller and FHFA house price reports for June, let’s take a look at how they fit in to the overall market, and in particular on housing affordability. To begin with, let me repeat the general formula for the housing market: interest rates lead sales sales lead prices prices lead inventory Turning to the reports, in June, the 20-city Case Shiller house price index...

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Marrying NAFTA and The TPP: The US-Mexico “Trade Agreement”

Marrying NAFTA and The TPP: The US-Mexico “Free Trade Agreement” I really am not sure where to begin with this latest farce, Trump’s announcement yesterday of a supposed US-Mexico Free Trade Agreement.  Of course there was the farce of him trying to make the announcement with a live phone call between him and outgoing Mexican President Pena-Nieto (to be replaced on Dec. 1 by leftist populist Obrador), which took awhile to get going.  There is the...

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Even if the yield curve tightens no further, there will be consequences next year

  by New Deal democrat Even if the yield curve tightens no further, there will be consequences next year Both my posts from yesterday morning and today dealt with two aspects of the implications of the Fed raising rates. The unifying idea beneath both of them is that the Fed’s raising rates is already having consequences in the economy; consequences that are likely to be amplified should the Fed continue on its present path. And we have a pretty good...

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What the compressed yield curve means for employment

What the compressed yield curve means for employment Aside from the threat of a recession down the road, is there cause for concern by economic Progressives in the fact that the yield curve has tightened (i.e., the difference in interest rates between long and short term bonds has become very small)? In a word, Yes. Four times during the 1980s and 1990s the difference in the interest yield between 2 and 10 year treasury bonds got about as low as it is...

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